Safety, Emergency Procedures & Bad Weather Courses

 In

Event safety considers the impact of all actions on competitors, marshals and potentially the emergency services such as a Mountain Rescue Team. Safety considerations are dynamic and may change as the race progresses and the weather conditions deteriorate. The Race Director’s decision will be final in all matters relating to safety.

Competitor Safety

The nature and the challenge of the ROC Mountain Marathon is that competitors remain self-sufficient and responsible for their own safety throughout the event. Should an accident occur it is initially the competitors’ responsibility to look after each other and raise the alarm. In the event of an accident ensure that the casualty is put in their sleeping bag (and any spare sleeping bags), in a survival bag and in a tent. Use your whistle to summon help and ensure you make a careful note of your exact position (grid reference) and any features you can identify.

GPS Tracking: SOS Emergency Button / GPS Trackers

Your GPS tracker has an SOS Emergency Button. In the event of serious (threat to life or limb) incident, this button should be pressed immediately. Pressing this button (until it vibrates after ~3 seconds) is equivalent to dialing 999, and will initiate an emergency response by the emergency services and event staff*.

*However, because there are typically 1% accidental SOS Emergency Button presses per event, WE WILL IGNORE AN SOS MESSAGE IF THE TRACKER CONTINUES TO MOVE AFTER IT HAS BEEN ACTIVATED. IF YOU NEED ASSISTANCE, REMAIN AT YOUR LOCATION. ONLY PRESS THE CASUALTY’S OWN SOS EMERGENCY BUTTON AND ALWAYS LEAVE THE GPS TRACKER WITH THE CASUALTY.

Please note.  Although the GPS trackers record their location via GPS satellite signal, they only send out their location data and emergency messages via the mobile phone network (the same network that is used to send text messages). As such, there are black spots along the route where there is no network coverage. At these locations the tracker records its location every few seconds, buffering the data, and then sends it out once it is back in network coverage. In these black spots it is not possible to send an SOS message but always worth trying. In the event of an emergency, and with no mobile phone signal, raise the alarm by seeking our closest Checkpoint, and by alerting a fellow participant.

Each team’s GPS track will be live in real-time during the event. Every team’s GPS track will be publicly available to download as a GPX file after the event, and also available to watch via a ‘replay’ function on the event website.

The Golden Rule

Once registered, each competitor must download their SI data from their dibber at the Day 1 Finish on the first day, and the Event Centre on Day 2, before departing regardless of whether they are retired or not (or even not started). This is our check to account for everyone being safely off the hill.

Emergency Procedure

If a team has not finished AND downloaded their SI data at the Event Centre by 1600 on the Sunday AND they have failed to contact the organisers on the Emergency Telephone Number (printed on the maps) then the Police and Mountain Rescue may be notified and a search organised. The competitors Next of Kin will be contacted at this point.

Bad Weather Course

A bad weather course maybe declared at anytime by the Race Director and in this instance, competitors must omit certain checkpoints (the overall time for the score format courses will be reduced). Details of the bad weather course are printed on the map.

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